Seeking the ultimate sense of ”Uchi-aji”(striking)

Our institute is an online salon (interactive communication dojo) managed by Mr. Morimasa Okada (8-dan Kyoshi, Shodokan Director).

The first director learned the techniques and theories of sword fighting it has been handed down for three generations from his teacher, Goro Saimura 10-dan, at the Metropolitan Police Department.When he was a supervisor, he led his alma mater, Nippon sports science university, to the top of Japan.Using the latest digital technology,you can learn effectively through interactive communication.

Morihiro Sensei was also engaged in the establishment of the "Keishi-cho Kendo Kihon"(Metropolitan Police Department kendo Basics) as an assistant to Saimura Sensei during his tenure at the Metropolitan Police Department.
The following is a memoir of Saimura Sensei written by Morihiro Sensei for the book "Modern Kendo Hundred Proverbs", published by All Japan Kendo Federation. Saimura-sensei's teachings on the "ultimate aspect" described in this book have been sought after by three generations of Shodokan principals, and also a guideline that our laboratory should seek to follow.

"Modern Kendo Hundred Proverbs"

This is a photo of a demonstration of Japanese Kendo Kata by Saimura and Mochida 10-dan at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.Their posture and sword-handling were flowing and beautiful, and it was a scene that showed the world that kendo has been sublimated to an art form.

It would not be an exaggeration to say that both of them laid the foundation of modern kendo by practicing "Sutemi no Keiko," the practice of stepping in and out from a distance, which they mastered at the Budo Technical College

Photo: Collection of Master Kinji Wada

Affordable Bronze Membership Plan is now on sale!

Our main contents, lesson videos and columns, can now be viewed with English translation.
Only 500 yen per month for one video per month!

You can view the trial content for free here until August 31.

You can watch the archive of the International Open Online Seminar held on 08 August
A public international online live seminar was held on 08 August. The archive of that event can be viewed here. The topic was 'The effectiveness of Shinogi in Kendo' by Okada 8-dan and it was translated in English.

Member Services

Instructional video streaming

GOLD MEMBER
1time/week*1
SILVER MEMBER
1 time/week*1
BRONZE MEMBER
1 time/month*2

You can watch all the instructional videos for Salon students only.
(Basic movement, kendo kata, technique practice, corrective methods by issue)

*1 Japanese audio, Japanese subtitles (English subtitles available only once a month)
*2 Japanese audio, English subtitles

Free Trial Video

View more videos

Column article browsing

GOLD MEMBER
1time/week*3
SILVER MEMBER
1time/week*3
BRONZE MEMBER
1time/month*4

You can read the column articles posted by the leader, Okada 8-dan, which are only for salon students.

*3 Japanese and English articles(English articles will be delivered later.)
*4 Japanese and English articles

Invitation to Closed Facebook Group

GOLD MEMBER
Applicable

In the private Facebook group for Salon students, you can freely exchange opinions, share your own practice recordings, and discuss and expand your knowledge.
*Basically Japanese only

Live lecture streaming

GOLD MEMBER
1 time/month*1
SILVER MEMBER
Irregularly held*1

You can watch Okada 8-dan's live lecture and practice concerning kendo.Interactive communication, such as question and answer sessions, is possible through the use of ZOOM.
In addition, even if you are unable to participate on the day of the live broadcast, you will be able to watch the archive at a later date. (For Gold members only)
*Basically Japanese only

Invitation to regular practice sessions

GOLD MEMBER
1time/month*1

You are invited to a regular training session (=Practical Training Session).
*The basic session will be held at Shodokan in Tokyo.
*We are planning to hold more events in local areas.
*In the event that we are unable to practice due to unforeseen circumstances, such as a request to cancel a meeting to prevent the spread of infectious diseases, the content may be changed to a live-streamed lecture・ *Basically Japanese only

Private coaching through a Personal LINE account

GOLD MEMBER
Applicable

You can easily ask questions on LINE that you can't ask in the personal community. You can communicate with us when you have free time.

* Basically Japanese only

Plan Menu

We offer three types of membership plans to best meet your diverse needs.

Gold Member Silver Member Bronze Member
4,400 yen/month 1,800 yen/month 500 yen/month
Instructional video streaming 1time/week*1 1time/week*1 1time/month*2
Column article browsing 1time/week*3 1time/week*3 1time/month*4
Invitation to Private Facebook Group Applicable*1 None None
Live lecture streaming(ZOOM) 1time/month*5 Irregularly held*1 None
Invitation to regular Keiko 1time/month*5 None None
Private coaching through a special LINE account Aapplicable*5 None None
  • *1 Japanese audio, Japanese subtitles (English subtitles available only once a month)
  • *2 Japanese audio, English subtitles
  • *3 Japanese and English articles(English articles will be delivered later.)
  • *4 Japanese and English articles
  • *5 Basically Japanese only
Monthly fee
Gold Member 4,400 yen/month
Silver Member 1,800 yen/month
Bronze Member 500 yen/month
Instructional video streaming
Gold Member 1 time/week*1
Silver Member 1 time/week*1
Bronze Member 1 time/month*2
Column article browsing
Gold Member 1 time/week*3
Silver Member 1 time/week*3
Bronze Member 1 time/month*4
Invitation to Private Facebook Group
Gold Member Applicable*5
Silver Member None
Bronze Member None
Live lecture streaming(ZOOM)
Gold Member 1 time/week*5
Silver Member None
Bronze Member None
Invitation to regular Keiko
Gold Member 1 time/month*5
Silver Member None
Bronze Member None
Private coaching through a special LINE account*5
Gold Member Aapplicable
Silver Member None
Bronze Member None
  • *1 Japanese audio, Japanese subtitles (English subtitles available only once a month)
  • *2 Japanese audio, English subtitles
  • *3 Japanese and English articles(English articles will be delivered later.)
  • *4 Japanese and English articles
  • *5 Basically Japanese only

Membership Registration

Moderator Introduction

Morimasa OKADA

1967 Born in Tokyo, Japan,He received instruction in kendo (including iaido and koryu kenjutsu) from his grandfather, Morihiro, and father, Yasuhiko, when he was a child,and went on to study at the Nippon Sport Science University.

After graduating from university, he became the third director of Shodokan (@Tokyo) at the tender age of 22.At the same time, he worked as an assistant in the Budo Laboratory of the Nippon Sport Science University, and taught at the Kendo Club of Keio University's Faculty of Medicine and Waseda University's High School Kendo Club.Since then, he has been a part-time lecturer at the Nippon Sport Science University, a sports specialist, and a kendo club coach. She won the 2007 All Japan Kendo Championship for Women, the 2009 All Japan Kendo Championship for Women (Aya Nishino), and the 2015 Kanto Kendo Championship for Students.His students include Tai Watanabe (current Kumamoto Prefectural Police, two-time world champion), Ryo Murase (current coach of Nippon Sport Science University, Ouka Junior and Senior High School, former world champion), Michihide Maihara (current Osaka Prefectural Police), and Yasunori Kaizuka (current coach of Ebara High School, Nittai), as well as many other famous players and instructors who are active nationwide.Shodokan has instructed many entrepreneurs, doctors, teachers, celebrities, and others in a variety of fields, and in the last three years has produced 13 people who have been promoted to 7th dan.

Morimasa OKADA

Morimasa OKADA

Morimasa OKADA

1967 Born in Tokyo, Japan,He received instruction in kendo (including iaido and koryu kenjutsu) from his grandfather, Morihiro, and father, Yasuhiko, when he was a child,and went on to study at the Nippon Sport Science University.

After graduating from university, he became the third director of Shodokan (@Tokyo) at the tender age of 22.At the same time, he worked as an assistant in the Budo Laboratory of the Nippon Sport Science University, and taught at the Kendo Club of Keio University's Faculty of Medicine and Waseda University's High School Kendo Club.Since then, he has been a part-time lecturer at the Nippon Sport Science University, a sports specialist, and a kendo club coach. She won the 2007 All Japan Kendo Championship for Women, the 2009 All Japan Kendo Championship for Women (Aya Nishino), and the 2015 Kanto Kendo Championship for Students.His students include Tai Watanabe (current Kumamoto Prefectural Police, two-time world champion), Ryo Murase (current coach of Nippon Sport Science University, Ouka Junior and Senior High School, former world champion), Michihide Maihara (current Osaka Prefectural Police), and Yasunori Kaizuka (current coach of Ebara High School, Nittai), as well as many other famous players and instructors who are active nationwide.Shodokan has instructed many entrepreneurs, doctors, teachers, celebrities, and others in a variety of fields, and in the last three years has produced 13 people who have been promoted to 7th dan.

On the other hand, he has established the French Shodokan's European branches such as the French Shodokai and the Shodokan Vondé, and has been teaching abroad.In addition, he was appointed as a lecturer at a seminar held by the Melbourne Budokai (Kenshi-kan) in Australia, and travels to Australia on a regular basis to promote kendo internationally.
In 2018, he founded the General Incorporated Association for the Preservation and Inheritance of Traditional Culture, Shodo Gakuin, and became its president.

All Japan Kendo Federation, Kendo Kyoshi, 2004

All Japan Kendo Federation, 8th Dan in Kendo, 2015

On the other hand, he has established the French Shodokan's European branches such as the French Shodokai and the Shodokan Vondé, and has been teaching abroad.In addition, he was appointed as a lecturer at a seminar held by the Melbourne Budokai (Kenshi-kan) in Australia, and travels to Australia on a regular basis to promote kendo internationally.
In 2018, he founded the General Incorporated Association for the Preservation and Inheritance of Traditional Culture, Shodo Gakuin, and became its president.

All Japan Kendo Federation, Kendo Kyoshi, 2004

All Japan Kendo Federation, 8th Dan in Kendo, 2015

Usage examples

Male, 4-dan, 40 years old (Kagoshima, Amami Oshima)

"I don't have many opportunities to learn from high-dan people, but I'm going to practice the precise teaching methods I learned online."

I started kendo in kindergarten, but left kendo in the first year of junior high school and had a blank period of about 20 years after that. 13 years ago, my son, who was in kindergarten at the time, started kendo, and as a father, I visited a local youth sports team. I was reunited with a kendo friend from elementary school who was teaching there.

Now, I practice three times a week at the Amami Kendo Federation branch training session with about 4 to 15 people, focusing on basic training, response training, and ground training.

I found out about the online salon through Facebook, and was then invited to join the public live lecture streaming by an friend, which seriously made me wonder about joining. I made up my mind when I found out that the person who passed the 8-dan examination on youtube, who had previously shocked me, was actually Okada Sensei. His sword handling had made me wish that one day I could do kendo like him.

Here, my position was to teach the children, but since the high-dan instructors came only a few times a year, I had few opportunities to learn, and I was struggling every day with the fact that I had to teach in my own way. Especially, I learned the basic techniques using a wooden sword, kiai-nuki, and the 80cm stepping technique, which I watched repeatedly and immediately put into practice when teaching the children. In the future, I would like to learn Okada Sensei's teaching methods and spread them to the community.

Although I usually have only a limited number of training partners, watching Shodokan's training online has been a great learning opportunity for me. Also, I am very grateful to be able to post my own practice videos on the Facebook community and receive valuable comments from Okada Sensei and other members.

I appreciate the environment where we can communicate with each other frequently even though we are practicing far away from each other, and I feel that this will be useful for many things in the future.

Male, 4-dan, 40 years old (Kagoshima, Amami Oshima)

"I don't have many opportunities to learn from high-dan people, but I'm going to practice the precise teaching methods I learned online."

I started kendo in kindergarten, but left kendo in the first year of junior high school and had a blank period of about 20 years after that. 13 years ago, my son, who was in kindergarten at the time, started kendo, and as a father, I visited a local youth sports team. I was reunited with a kendo friend from elementary school who was teaching there.

Now, I practice three times a week at the Amami Kendo Federation branch training session with about 4 to 15 people, focusing on basic training, response training, and ground training.

I found out about the online salon through Facebook, and was then invited to join the public live lecture streaming by an friend, which seriously made me wonder about joining. I made up my mind when I found out that the person who passed the 8-dan examination on youtube, who had previously shocked me, was actually Okada Sensei. His sword handling had made me wish that one day I could do kendo like him.

Here, my position was to teach the children, but since the high-dan instructors came only a few times a year, I had few opportunities to learn, and I was struggling every day with the fact that I had to teach in my own way. Especially, I learned the basic techniques using a wooden sword, kiai-nuki, and the 80cm stepping technique, which I watched repeatedly and immediately put into practice when teaching the children. In the future, I would like to learn Okada Sensei's teaching methods and spread them to the community.

Although I usually have only a limited number of training partners, watching Shodokan's training online has been a great learning opportunity for me. Also, I am very grateful to be able to post my own practice videos on the Facebook community and receive valuable comments from Okada Sensei and other members.

I appreciate the environment where we can communicate with each other frequently even though we are practicing far away from each other, and I feel that this will be useful for many things in the future.

Male, 2-dan, 40s (dentist)

"I have limited time to practice, but I hope to learn without going too far."

I was a member of a kendo club in junior high school, but left kendo in high school. 2 years ago, I had a dream in my first dream of the New Year that I was going to practice again, so I started again.

Due to work and family commitments, I was only able to practice once or twice a month, so I was on the lookout for something I could do after work and housework were done. I used to watch youtube videos of famous fighters and wanted to look cool and win fights, but I felt something was different and not what I wanted to achieve, so I was looking for books and videos where I could learn the basics.

Then, I saw Okada-sensei's instructional videos on FaceBook, and intuitively felt that he was telling me what I wanted to know, so I immediately joined. As a result, I was able to receive instruction that met my expectations, and I was also pleased to meet and learn from many other members who shared the same goals.

The instructional videos were especially useful, particularly the kendo kata. At the recent examination, I felt confident that I knew the riai better than anyone else in the hall. In the column, I learned about the history of kendo, which I had never known before, and it has made me more aware of myself as a Kendo person, which I think has had a positive impact on my work.

My goal is to get my 7th dan while I'm still alive, and since I restarted after I got older, I don't want to take shortcuts, but I don't want to take the long way around. He has been very helpful to me in pinpointing and clarifying questions that I cannot ask at the dojo, and I can go over them again and again.

At first, I was afraid to ask questions to an 8-dan sensei, but I am grateful for his warm response to my individual questions. Also, I can ask questions on line as soon as I think of them, which is very useful.

Male, 2-dan, 40s (dentist)

"I have limited time to practice, but I hope to learn without going too far."

I was a member of a kendo club in junior high school, but left kendo in high school. 2 years ago, I had a dream in my first dream of the New Year that I was going to practice again, so I started again.

Due to work and family commitments, I was only able to practice once or twice a month, so I was on the lookout for something I could do after work and housework were done. I used to watch youtube videos of famous fighters and wanted to look cool and win fights, but I felt something was different and not what I wanted to achieve, so I was looking for books and videos where I could learn the basics.

Then, I saw Okada-sensei's instructional videos on FaceBook, and intuitively felt that he was telling me what I wanted to know, so I immediately joined. As a result, I was able to receive instruction that met my expectations, and I was also pleased to meet and learn from many other members who shared the same goals.

The instructional videos were especially useful, particularly the kendo kata. At the recent examination, I felt confident that I knew the riai better than anyone else in the hall. In the column, I learned about the history of kendo, which I had never known before, and it has made me more aware of myself as a Kendo person, which I think has had a positive impact on my work.

My goal is to get my 7th dan while I'm still alive, and since I restarted after I got older, I don't want to take shortcuts, but I don't want to take the long way around. He has been very helpful to me in pinpointing and clarifying questions that I cannot ask at the dojo, and I can go over them again and again.

At first, I was afraid to ask questions to an 8-dan sensei, but I am grateful for his warm response to my individual questions. Also, I can ask questions on line as soon as I think of them, which is very useful.

Female, 6-dan, 40s

"My goal is not to win or lose, but to improve myself and express myself in kendo."

I began practicing kendo in the first grade of elementary school, and from the fifth grade to the third grade of junior high school, I lived in Canada, but continued to practice once a week during that time.

When I joined the Keio University Kendo Club, I experienced the rigorous training for the first time and took up kendo in earnest. I continued to practice even after I became an employee, and last year I obtained my 6th dan.

When I was a child, I was praised for both winning and losing, but when I was in college, I was put in an environment that strictly demanded victory or defeat, and out of frustration that I lost the Waseda-Keio game because of my own fault, I continued to practice kendo and have become completely fascinated with it. Now, I practice three times a week: with my children, with other women, and with a high-dan sensei.

It all started when I met someone on FaceBook. I had been unable to study under one sensei because I had to move around a lot, but I joined the club in hopes that I would be able to learn what I needed to learn as a high dan. Since women have physical limitations, I was very impressed by Okada Sensei's words, "To achieve the maximum effect with the minimum force.

Through teaching children, I sympathized with Okada Sensei's teaching process of making hypotheses about individual issues and solving them through repeated verification. I would like to practice this with confidence in the future.

My own issue is to "hold the shinai like a wooden sword", and as a result of being conscious of "holding the shinai as if plucking it", I was able to face my opponent with a completely different feeling. In addition, the articles in the column appealed to my sensibilities and views on kendo, which greatly influenced me to improve myself.

My current goal is to challenge for 8-dan together with my husband. I would like to polish my own sensibility, aiming to be able to perform the riai that Sensei indicated as the meaning of the examination: "It is a place where you can express yourself and have it evaluated.

Female, 6-dan, 40s

"My goal is not to win or lose, but to improve myself and express myself in kendo."

I began practicing kendo in the first grade of elementary school, and from the fifth grade to the third grade of junior high school, I lived in Canada, but continued to practice once a week during that time.

When I joined the Keio University Kendo Club, I experienced the rigorous training for the first time and took up kendo in earnest. I continued to practice even after I became an employee, and last year I obtained my 6th dan.

When I was a child, I was praised for both winning and losing, but when I was in college, I was put in an environment that strictly demanded victory or defeat, and out of frustration that I lost the Waseda-Keio game because of my own fault, I continued to practice kendo and have become completely fascinated with it. Now, I practice three times a week: with my children, with other women, and with a high-dan sensei.

It all started when I met someone on FaceBook. I had been unable to study under one sensei because I had to move around a lot, but I joined the club in hopes that I would be able to learn what I needed to learn as a high dan. Since women have physical limitations, I was very impressed by Okada Sensei's words, "To achieve the maximum effect with the minimum force.

Through teaching children, I sympathized with Okada Sensei's teaching process of making hypotheses about individual issues and solving them through repeated verification. I would like to practice this with confidence in the future.

My own issue is to "hold the shinai like a wooden sword", and as a result of being conscious of "holding the shinai as if plucking it", I was able to face my opponent with a completely different feeling. In addition, the articles in the column appealed to my sensibilities and views on kendo, which greatly influenced me to improve myself.

My current goal is to challenge for 8-dan together with my husband. I would like to polish my own sensibility, aiming to be able to perform the riai that Sensei indicated as the meaning of the examination: "It is a place where you can express yourself and have it evaluated.